Mr Bubbles.

This was a fun project for a friend who was dissatisfied with the quality of the Big Daddy figure available in some special edition of the BioShock game for 360. His wasn’t shattered and in pieces, as, in my reading, I see was the case for many who also bought this special edition and acquired this model. But it wasn’t exactly a Fantastic Plastic resin kit or anything. It was a fun project because of the scale, because I tried my first major repose of a figure, and because it was a model I wouldn’t otherwise have access to.

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The kit as I received it. Forgive the misuse of the word “kit” – force of habit.

 

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Attentione, Il Est Myron!

 

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I wanted the Big Daddy to be bulkier, and so chose to lean it forward. This made it appear a little more hulking. To do this, I sawed off the right foot at the ankle, the left leg at the knee and waist, the drill arm at the shoulder, and the left arm at the shoulder and wrist. The legs were reposed first. Joints taking more weight than others (like the left waist and knee) were double pinned, the others joined with a single pin. To increase the flexion of these joints, and lean the model forward, I used sandwiches of plasticard through which ran the pin(s). These joints were the right ankle, left knee, and left wrist.

 

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Once the two-part epoxy resin which I used on all the joins dried, I went to work covering these joints with green stuff and repairing the damage of the saw. At the joins that had been extended, the left knee and right wrist, I sculpted the folds of the undersuit. The belt at the left hip and the gasket seals on the Big Daddy’s shoulders needed the most repair work. I think it feels more intimidating in its new pose, despite how simple and uncreative it might be.

 

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The base. Two MDF coasters glued together with Aquadhere, Evergreen Scale Models’ “Sidewalk” plasticard, some cork from a wine bottle, and some sandy flock.

 

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The undercoat – matt black.

 

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Base colours, then ink. I think the model would have been too metallic had I extended the metallic bronze from the bathysphere head to the torso, particularly with the drill and tanks on its back. So the torso was basecoated Flat Earth; the oversuit on the limbs Black Grey; the drill, suit joins, toe caps, dorsal tanks and knees were painted Boltgun Metal; the leather German Camo Medium Brown, the bathysphere head Brazen brass. I then mixed an ink of Chaos Black, water, detergent, and some rust weathering powder.

 

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I went over the basecolours again, avoiding shadows.

 

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First layer of highlights. Because of the big spaces on this model, I opted to feather the highlights. Every base colour was mixed about three parts to one with Green Ochre. Boltgun Metal was mixed with Mithril Silver.

 

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Under the floodlight! Another round of feathering, this time with more Green Ochre (50:50). The tiled floor, while not the right scale to match the tiled floor of Rapture, still has that art deco feel. All the white tiles were painted with Basalt Grey then Skull White. The rubble was painted variations of German Camo Beige WW2 or Basalt Grey. The “eyes” were painted first with Green Ochre, then Yellow Ochre, and Yellow Ochre and Skull White (75:25).

 

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Almost there. I was originally going to write one of those creepy messages in blood found throughout Rapture, but decided instead to adopt the less-is-more approach. A few spatters on the side of the bathysphere head and belly, and the tip of the drill. The base was heavily drybrushed with Black Grey, then Basalt Grey. This picked up the sand scattered around the cork debris. A few drips on the ground underneath and behind the drill. Areas of rust were done using rust weathering powder mixed with water.

 

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Konnyets. Not as good as it could be, as I can only see my mistakes when I look at something I’ve painted. But much better than what it was. I think this project breathed some life into a tired space. Wow, I feel like Johanna Griggs.

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23 Responses to Mr Bubbles.

  1. Big_Adam says:

    Sweet chilli jebus thats nice.

    I’m a big fan of bioshock (only started playing it). You do it a great service with the awesome-ness of this Bouncer.

  2. chriswales says:

    Wow, that looks so much better than the original :D

  3. Jae says:

    Wow, nice job. I mean, really, REALLY nice job.

  4. Pingback: MMO Clerks » Your Big Daddy Could Have Looked Like This [Bioshock]

  5. chrix says:

    totally awesome. good work. good luck in future projects.

  6. Pingback: www.tibia4you.org Opisy broni, magii, pancerzy, przedmiotów i map, zasady gry, poradniki. » Blog Archive » (K) Your Big Daddy Could Have Looked Like This [Bioshock]

  7. claus ka says:

    you got skillz.. Great work

  8. Radioeye says:

    Man, this is great.

    How ’bout I send you mine, and you do the same thing?

    Name a price. :)

    Seriously, though. I’m not kidding. I gave you my e-mail.

  9. Adam says:

    Looks rad man, I don’t think many of your overseas visitors will get the Johanna Griggs reference. Made me laugh though.

  10. wicko says:

    Agreed, I wouldn’t mind having mine just repainted.. with one of those tiled stands as well. So awesome.

  11. Jay says:

    You can’t post something this awesome without fostering extreme envy.

    I’m with Radioeye… What would you charge to do this?

  12. Lauren says:

    I just finished up a post of this and it’ll appear on tomopop live soon :D Check out the preview however – http://tomopop.com/post.phtml?pk=4355&un=Lauren+Wainwright

  13. Pingback: Your Big Daddy Could Have Looked Like This [Bioshock] | Non-Stop Gaming News

  14. Alnitak says:

    Oh, that is just sweet, sir =)

  15. flunkie44 (JT Payne) says:

    WOW. Awesome. That’s all I can say.

  16. jim says:

    Amazing job – I’d also be curious to see what you’d charge to mod mine as well!

  17. Clayman says:

    hey that is great work. i make sculptures of many video game characters. and im almost done my big daddy from bioshock. please check out my myspace and let me know what you think! its almost done, so in about a week or so ill put pics up of it.

  18. Tom says:

    That is fricking fantastic,
    I’d totally be interested to know if you’re actually taking people up on offers to redo their BD. I definiely would be in the market.

  19. Joe_Ske says:

    Again, this looks awesome. Well Done. I tried picking up a couple extra Big Daddies off ebay and ended up with two busted up ones out of four. Sucks that they are so fragile. But this gives me hope that something cool can be done to them. I’m also a fan of paying to get these tricked out if that is even feasible. Let me know if it is.

  20. Pingback: Admiral Graf Spee. « Schwerpunkt

  21. Justin says:

    I’m currently trying to replicate what you did with the Big Daddy figure, and was curious as to what you used to saw the joints. ( hacksaw, dremel, etc..) I am also curious as to what exactly the green stuff you used to a cover the joint modifications was. Any and all tips or hints would be greatly appeciated.

  22. schwerpunktstudios says:

    Justin,

    For this model I used a modelling saw, but only because I had snapped all of my cutting pads for my Dremel. I think the Dremel would work best, and save you a lot of effort.

    As for the Green Stuff, a good guide to this compound can be found here: http://www.bananaking.net/cento/workshop/conv_green.htm

    If you’re using the Dremel you shouldn’t have to worry about sculpting the detail destroyed by the saw, as was the case for me. It’s a very simple affair to fill gaps with any of the compounds listed in that article.

    Best wishes, and thanks for your questions!

    Schwerpunkt

  23. Justin says:

    Thanks for the tips, I forgot to ask as to what 2 part epoxy and what you used as pins. I only have one figure available and want to have everything planned out before i begin this endeavor.

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